Failing a Class and Academic Probation: What happens?

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Failing a Class and Academic Probation: What happens?

Owen Szymczak, Author

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The end of the semester is just around the corner, and so is when your grades come out. Grades are due Dec. 14 since teachers have to have everything uploaded by Dec. 16, 11:59. If you’re at risk of being put on academic probation, or failing a class, then there will be several consequences that will hinder your future success.

Failing a class sounds awful on its own, but the results are even worse. Failing a class will increase the possibility to graduate late, reduce college acceptance rate, reduced scholarship dollars, and it will be on your permanent transcript. Not only is this bad on its own, you cannot retake the class during the schools normal 9-4 schedule. You must either attend summer school, take online school, or night school to make up the credits for it. To reduce the chances of failing a class, utilize your resources such as attending study tables, asking from help from your teachers or friends, and any online resource that helps you in the best way.

Not only is failing a class bad for you academically, it could also put you on academic probation. Academic probation occurs when you have an F (IB score of 1) in any class, three D’s, (IB score of 2), or attendance less than 90% (unless noted for medical). Being put on academic probation requires you to set achievable academic goals, attend and document study sessions each week, meet with your Advisory Teacher once a week to ensure that notebooks, homework, and tasks are in order, meet with the curriculum coordinator to discuss overall performance, and meet with the counselor as needed.

You will only have one quarter to get off academic probation, and during that time, you will be unable to participate in any athletics or extracurricular activities. That means no baseball, no basketball, no musical nor plays, no extracurriculars at all. Academic probation hinders your enjoyment in your high school life, and you should always try to avoid it.

In the end, failing a class and being put on academic probation will hurt your school life and your future. Try to keep your grades up in order to dodge these consequences.